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book critics circle winner laura and robert. and, finally, dave eggers. and stephen king, recipient of the national book foundation's medal for distinguished contributions to american letters. please join me in recognizing these great american writers. [applause] i would like to thank our financial supporters without him we could not bring you the awards, or our programs. again, i will ask you to hold your applause until i read the list. premier sponsors, barnes & noble, thanks guys, random house, the ford foundation, leadership sponsors, clinton meyer book publishing papers, a division of central national, coral graphics, penguin, and sponsors amazon, google, harper collins, stephen king, and deborah wiley, thank you. [applause] now for something special. i'd like to acknowledge in our audience the winners of our fourth annual innovation and reading prize funded by the lavender foundation. if you are worried about the next generation of book lovers, just listen to this list and again hold your applause until i'm finished. we have with us tonight 15 year old lily-white from coral ga
with author and journalist new book america's great debate stephen douglas and the compromise of preserve the union. will was so great about the great compromise? >> well most people would say they have only a vague recollection from high school. there was a crisis in 1850. the nature of the crisis was this. the country went to the brink of the civil war. most of the political culture and most americans thought the war was great to take place but the deep south was going to succeed and they were closer to the secession than most americans today even realize. certainly the deep south state. texas was arming other southern states were sending. had there been a collision with began in 1850 wouldn't have begun in charleston would have begun in santa fe mexico y? because texas did its own imperial ambitions to move westward supported by the slave holding south and to invade the new mexico territory. there were many other parts of the crisis with or not the last would be free. in 1850 the south was mother eternized, southern nationalism was at the peak. jefferson davis in 1850 said if the south
is stephen carter and he is the author, among many other books of this one, his most recent, "the impeachment of abraham lincoln: a novel." professor carter, they are to premise in here that i want to get to that are historically inaccurate. number one, abraham lincoln survived the assassination of him, and abraham lincoln is impeached. where did you come up with this? >> i start by making clear that in spite of the title, i am a lincoln fan. this is not an argument on behalf of lincoln's impeachment. it's not a brief -- it's just a novel and for me as a fan and someone interested in history, what if lincoln had survived and what if, in my telling as political enemies, he had many including in his own party which would tend to forget, political enemies as late as 1865 were looking for way to get them out of the way. what if you tried to do it the impeachment process. >> but again, where did you come up with the idea? when did it occur to you that this might be a fun thing to do? >> i don't know when it decided to turn the novel. i remember when i was back in college, chatting with one of my
of buena vista in the first months of 1847. the second theater of war, general stephen carney travels west from fort leavenworth in kansas to new mexico, conquering new mexico to california. that happens about the same time. neither of these tremendously to restrain what polk wants, which is peace and the securing of california and texas into the american union. mexico refuses to surrender despite the fact trees of both taylor and carney. the poked pope is jesus and winfield scott to invade central mexico. he bombards veracruz and travels through central mexico securing the capital of the fall of 1847. now in the eyes of americans, it was sort of a foregone conclusion that there sideway because most u.s. citizens harbored a host of racist police of mexican men. foremost among them being mexican men were too lazy and cowardly to fight. in point of fact, mexican troops but very hard as you can see in this print, mexico produces few images of the were so it's great when you find them so you can get a sense of how their envisioning this happening. mexico lost all of these battles and ultimatel
below, my name is stephen and i have military affiliation. i would like to ask a question that is outside the box. but everything that you are all saying, sort of assumes that there should be some type administered ivy university for the academic achievement, and i would like to throw out to you the idea that every other service provided in our society was to be at that price. therefore when the people who most needed it would determine that they are willing to pay the price for the best education. in fact, a lot of times you have brilliant people who have known me to go to university, and they are going to get very little out of it. and it may be the weakest student gets the most out of the education. my question to you is why is this in any discussion, what i have just said of affirmative action or education? is pretty clear that the customers and the situation are really not customers, the beneficiaries were the customers. >> part of that should be directed to alan. do you get your moneys worth out of higher education today we met. >> if they come to my classes, they de
with stephen ambrose, are you? >> guest: well, that may be putting it strongly. i admire stephen ambrose's ability to write. but i do take issue with his picture of libby custer. i think ultimately -- although he doesn't mean it this way -- it's insulting to libby. c-span: you say that "feminine fidelity has traditionally been so prized that libby custer's devotion has pleased even those who consider her husband a villain, as if fidelity to such a man has even greater merit than it would to a more deserving spouse. to historian stephen ambrose, libby was one of the most remarkable american women of the 19th century, although he never justifies his sweeping statement, remarking only that she had unbounded energy and was as courageous as custer himself both characterizations are nonsense." >> guest: yes, that's true. libby was not as courageous as custer. libby was terribly frightened of thunderstorms and hid under the bed whenever there was thunder. custer was known for his exceptional courage, leading his men into battle. i don't see that you can really make that comparison. but more tha
-broadway with music of stephen merritt of the magnetic fields and it was pretty wonderful. the first night i wound up sitting next to mark and gary, a beautiful place 15, 16-year-old young lady. my wife amanda was with manager douceur. it's because of morgan that this is a children's book because morgan was so scared. morgan said, i was terrified. [laughter] she said they knew that if i let on that i was terrified, i wouldn't find out what happened next. [laughter] so that is why caroline became a children's book. this on the other hand i would not really feel calm to pull. there's definite this. don't. questions. definitely ask, i asked randomly and dr. who. there are some good slipped into the other one. have you liked the famous writer vic or hugo ever been a bill in someone else's story and if not, how would you like to be? says at the bottom honestly, i am writing the story. [laughter] i don't know if this is spoilers, but if any of you saw my appearance on the simpsons, any of you who did not see "the simpsons" episode, please picture fingers in your ears. i always when it's time to take them o
. [applause] >> hi, i'm stephen king. [laughter] i was walking in here and this lady said new book much taller in your book jacket photos. [laughter] my boy jack came home from prep school yesterday, that thrill for me. it was devastating when he went away. where have you been my blue-eyed son? what i want to talk about today something close to my heart, which is the power of stories in the way stories can affect the world, the way stories can change things for the better. in just the power of what can happen. a writer friend of mine was walking on burke avenue in new york city and he passed a blind man who was assigned the good please help me i'm blind. my friend is kind of walked by them and, but then he stopped and he saw this guy only had a couple coins in his hat was so he dropped in a couple of quarters and then he asked the man permission to just change the story a little bit for this guy, which he did and later in the afternoon he came back and pass the guy again and the hut was full of coins of those and he stopped and talked to the guy in a blind man admitted have never had a day qui
of the page. >>> university of pennsylvania professor stephen hahn discusses his book the political world of slavery and freedom. that's next on booktv. he argues historians have presented an incomplete picture of african american emancipation and struggle for civil rights that followed. professor hahn was interviewed at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia as part of book tv college series. >> university of pennsylvania history professor steven speed is the author of this book "the and political worlds of slavery and freedom." professor hahn before we get into the subject of the book what is this image on the front cover? >> that's a very good question coming and the answer is i have no idea. the editor and the press proposes it is a very eye-catching image. when i showed it to friends and colleagues to have no idea what it meant. it doesn't clearly relate to anything that took that's how they chose it. it's a really interesting photographs, and i think it speaks to complex connections within the african-american communities that involved gender as well as power but beyond that
. they are under our section called news about books. pulitzers this year, stephen greenblatt won for general nonfiction this word history delete many maribel, one for malcolm x and biography or autobiography. john lewis gaddis, george f. kennan and american life. what is this word about? >> guest: to swerve if i remember right, i admit i dipped into the book when it came out. it's fascinating. it was a little on the side of being i don't want to say -- intellectual. i don't mean to say that dismissively. that is about a palm. help me here. do you remember the name of the palm? we are funky and this exam here. rediscovered in the renaissance and then it changed the way it was published i guess you would say. printed or something. >> host: i didn't mean to but she was the spot there. >> guest: the cultures where did that and put in more modern take on life and the fear of dying is to put the fear of dying, which is far more predominate and stops people from doing things prior. at least that's the part of this work. >> host: sarah weinman, if a book is nominated or wins a national book award ar
. pulitzers this year, stephen greeneblack won this work, history, manning mirabel won for malcolm x, autobiography john lewis gas's george f. kennan, an american life. what is this swerve about? >> was a little on the side of being intellectual. i don't mean to say that dismissively. it is about a poem. the remember the name of the poem? >> not offhand. [talking over each other] >> rediscovered in the renaissance. then it changed the way -- it was published -- >> brought out. >> printed. >> and mean to put you on the spot but it is called "the swerve". cultures swerve a bit and took on a modern take on life and fear dying is the big thing. it dealt with the fear of dying which was more predominant and stopped people from doing things prior to this and that is part of "the swerve". >> of the book is nominated wins a national book award or nominated and wins a pulitzer does it change sales? >> as an example to answer your question, the pulitzer prize did not award a prize in fiction this year which was the first time that it happened since the late 1970s and there was a huge uproar la
. >> stephen carter we been talking to the national book festival. "the impeachment of abraham lincoln," if you want to know how it turns out, here's the book. you can buy to sell. stephen carter, thank you for joining us here in booktv for a few minutes. >> my pleasure, thank you so much. >> next, from the 12 annual national book festival, elizabeth dowling taylor presents her book, "a slave in the white house: paul jennings and the madisons." it's about 45 minutes. >> good afternoon. first i am a first time author, and i'm thrilled to be here. [applause] this was a true labor of love. i researched my topic for three years and spent a year-plus writing it. it is hummabling and gratifying to see it so well received, and to be following walter isakson, robert caro, and tony. [applause] i came to develop a strong interest in paul jennings when i was director of education at james madison's month peelier in virginia. i was familiar with jennings' memoir considered by the white house historical association to be the first memoir of life in the white house. it was titled "a colored man's rem innoce
. [laughter] >> david souter and stephen breyer are frequently together. not too long ago, justice david souter was driving from here to new hampshire. and he stopped a little restaurant to get something to eat. a couple came up to him, and the guy said, i know you, you were on the supreme court. he said you are stephen breyer, right? and he didn't want to embarrass him in front of his wife and he said yes, i am. and they chatted for a little while. then the guy asked him a question that david souter wasn't ready for. >> the characters in my story or a backdrop of what would happen if you had to replace the majority of the court. my favorite is a nominating harold carswell. he was considered one of the highest caliber nominee for this report. he was panned in the press as being a mediocre lawyer and a mediocre presidents. one of his senate handlers trying to help said something to the effect of, you know, there's lots of mediocre lawyers and judges and people out there. don't they deserve representation, to? and so that was the end of his chances to become a justice. >> i think that is o
at the ground up. all the way up. [inaudible] let me talk about stephen's case, which he brought in the federal district court in new jersey. this was a man whose wife was a math teacher in high school. she had a healthy pregnancy. she remained in the classroom until the ninth month she went to the hospital to give birth, and the doctor came out and said, you have a healthy baby boy, but your wife died from an embolism. he was determined that he would not work full-time until the child was in school full-time. he would earn a minimum he could make, and combined with social security benefits, make a living for himself and his infant son. we went to the social security office. they said we are very sorry, but these are mothers benefits. they are not available. they are available to widowed mothers, but not widowed fathers. i came to know about stephen's case when he wrote a letter to the editor, and he said i've been hearing a lot of talk about women's this. this is what happened to me. how does that fit in? tell my story to gloria steinem. so at the time i was teaching at rutgers, the state univ
friend, stephen said. pulling aside the curtain, he saw the rain had stopped. it was a godsend. northeast of san francisco, four fifths of san francisco lay underwater. allowing passengers to enter their second city story hotel room by window. the 50 inches of icy wind and shotgun blast of black hail that had pummeled san francisco all winter had not misspelled the dreams of its citizens. they talked. heads filled with nightmares of what would happen when the downpour ended. they listen to the faint cracking of things and they watched the watch the clear glass of their lamp chimneys black and instead of being warm. they feared the worst. they dreaded the high winds off the bay nor the inclination to buy any water, maybe that san francisco would burn that would come after winter, six weeks without rain. san francisco springs would be much different, but the results would be the same. from his window, broderick made at the end of the road where father mounted and heat. these abandoned vessels had transported hundreds of thousands who had made the thousand ships orphaned. the callous callous
wanted to do. one of the historians who studied, i think it was -- stephen, said if jefferson hadn't decided to make it rather reckless investment of $30,000 in an outcome he probably would've been able to ride out the financial storms of the early 19th century. and another analysis of the financial records show that jefferson, a slaves actually were very productive farmers. and that in one of the first decades of the american agricultural economy, jefferson lost very little money on his farming operation. and so, the slaves were really holding their phones when commodity prices were plunging, and so, i mean and jefferson just kept spending -- the nail in the coffin for him financially was when he had alone with his in-laws. nicholas was speculating in kentucky land acquisitions, and he needed someone to cosign a $20,000 note and he talked jefferson into it and then six months later he went bankrupt. that's when the letters from monticello grill begin to get gloomy. -- really begin to get gloomy. >> i want to follow up -- >> we have a circulating microphone. >> all right. well, i w
www.big-books.org. www.big-books.org. >> we've been talking with professor stephen and this is his newest book oops serving our politicians stumble. we are at the naval academy. this is book tv on c-span2. >>> his onetime liberal ideologies and on several current and social issues next on book tv. mr. mamet delivers the 22 manhattan institute lecture at the plaza hotel in new york city. it's a little over one hour. [applause] >> what a magnificent introduction. thank you to all of you here tonight. as thinking about a friend of mine, rest in peace, and harold when he accepted the nobel prize he wrote a rather scathing indictment of the west. i thought back to the time i was making a movie with harold and we were shooting in a white truffle chapel in a jewish neighborhood and he started reminiscing about his life when growing up over his uncle's radio shop -- he was reminiscing over growing up over his uncle's radio shop in the jewish area chapel and his magnificent radio actor voice became skittish to 1938 and his face lit up remembering those days growing up in the warmth of the j
of the literary award and stephen king. please join me in recognizing these great american writers. [applause] i would like to our financial supporters. without whom woe couldn't bring you awards the or programs. i would like you to hold your applause until i've read the list. premier sponsors barnes & noble, ban skies, random house, the ford foundation, leadership sponsors. harper colins, stephen king, debra buy lee, thank you. [applause] [applause] okay, now for something special. i'd like to acknowledge in the audience the winner of the fourth annual innovation in reading prize. funded by the lessening gear foundation. listen to the list and hold your applause until i'm finished. we have 15-year-old lily. she started givingly briers in a homeless shelter where kids can take as many books as they want they'd would own not borrow. in chicago reading against the odds. enhancing the critical thinking skills of adult literacy learnings by introducing them to challenging book. the at the library in colorado a group of teens calling themselves the interesting readers society. produce unique book tel
adjoining the sort that discussion is stephen sloan, to start with, could you define frat a tax credit is and how that differs from a taxom deduction? >> guest: post-credits and deductions are used to lower somebody's tax bill. they credit lower somebody's tax bill dollar for dollar. if you say you have the $1000 tax credit come your tax lowere, -- basically a reduces taxable income, so it takes the taxable income off the top. if you have a $1,000 tax deduction, that is basically a to under $50 deduction -- $250 deduction. host: on their tax credits that specifically affect families? guest: some that have expired that are part of the fiscal cliff package. they get much less attention than the bush tax cuts. they are part of the packet of decisions that congress has to make. host: we can go into debt but to highlight four --th let's start with the child tax credit. what is it? guest: this is a credit that applies to families, some that you can use if you make up to ,000.0 it is they $1,000 credit for each child. unless congress acts, that 10000 becomedit will $500, but becomes less valu
the big-name author decides to self published james patterson, stephen king, i will be my own publisher. that has not have been the at. >> host: we are out of time. we asked both sarah weinman and bob minzesheimer in
to fight for the war before it started, he was repeatedly writing letters to stephen douglas. even though douglas was a democrat. and he already had a lot of military experience. he had bought in the black hawk war. and he actually was in charge of the mormons and state of illinois. he was a big military guy, a political guy, and he really wanted to buy mexico. he wrote letters to newspapers saying that this is our possible opportunity to gain california for the united states. and i will be the front of that movement. and in fact, he was. now, pardon is excited about the possibility of taking a lot of mexican territory and manifest destiny. when he gets to mexico, his views change pretty quickly and dramatically. when he gets to mexico, he writes about potential silver mines. and he says that the silver mines here are supposed to be the richest and mexico. and were only abandoned why the ignorance of the mexicans. and he said it would only require a little skill to make these valuable. but the longer he stayed there, the longer you like it. in december of 1846, just a few months after he
before even started. repeatedly writing letters to stephen douglas. and he already had a lot of military experience, flat in the black hawk war, an officer in that and he wasn't charged that taking the mormons and the state of illinois. a big military guy and political guy. he really wanted to fight mexico. he wrote letters to newspapers say, this is our greatest possible opportunity to gain california for the u.s. if war is declared, will be at the front of the movement committee was. now, he is a very, very a chat about the possibility of taking a lot of mexican territory. a big proponent of manifest destiny, but his views changed quickly and dramatically. when he first gets to mexico heat writes about potential silver mines that he has heard about and says, the silver mines here are supposed to be the richest and mexico, and we are only abandoned by the ignorance of the mexicans. it will only require a little skill to make these valuable. really excited, and he can see mexican american hands. the lottery's bins, the less he likes. in early december 1846, a few months after he arrives
stephen henderson -- detroit and everybody was the truly. really? i don't know. i think it is a distortion more than a distraction. all that stuff that is happening is great and exciting but such a tiny little pockets. [phone ringing] >> after reading -- i had a sense that even with the questions that he was asking me about the city, that he could speak detroit, he could see detroit and in seeing detroit what i really mean to say by that is he was able to see the totality of the people who live here because there are many ways in which particularly in this bubble as he calls it of the newly developed midtown downtown area, there is a tendency to they treat detroit as invisible. i have been on a mission for some time the invisibility of the actual african-american who make up the majority of the city. i was very clear he was not trying to do a positive story on detroit because the triteness of that is offensive too but he was trying to an objective and penetrate of look at the city and cutting through some of the myths of the city and the new development of the city because that has been my
with senator stephens on this, we got it done, so that facility stabbeds as a tribute to tan inouye. in 2010 i had a very difficult campaign, as most of us did at that time. and dan said, i'm going to come out there and help you. and i was under fierce attack, and we had an event for veterans, and dan was the speaker and i was the speaker, and as i was speaking we heard these voices of -- screaming demonstrators yelling things, which were not complimentary toward me. let's put it that way. but it was very loud, and i was so humiliate and embarrassed to hear what that's amazing patriot, and keep screaming when danny was speaking about my work and his work. sure enough, the demonstrators kept it up and i was so upset, and i went up to him and i put my arm around him and said, dan, i'm so embarrassed, i'm so sorry. he says, barbara, they're not going to beat you by screaming. don't worry about it. and he went on to go to a couple of events, and took his wife to them, and it was extraordinary. i love danny with all my heart. everytime i looked at him i smiled because he was so good. such a good pe
the release of a report detailing the security failures that led to the deaths of ambassador chris stephens and -- stevens and three other americans. >> the hearing will come to order. my apologies to everybody for the switch in time, but as everybody knows, with the loss of our colleague, senator inouye , the course of events was uncertain yesterday, and it was decided that he, his remains will be brought here at about 10:00. and everybody felt that it would be inappropriate for us to simply be having a hearing and prevebt senators from being able to attend, and all of us would like to attend that. so we are going to try to compact this into the period of time we have between now and about quarter of so that senators can get over there to take part in that ceremony. in addition, obviously with the switch in time, some colleagues and others have not yet gotten here. i do want to share some thoughts at the appropriate time about senator lieu garre and senator webb and senator demint who will be leaving the committee, but i think i will wait until some more of our colleagues are here to be ab
, stephen finan. this is live coverage on c-span2. >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> once again we are live on c-span2 at the immigrationworks u.s.a. at the woodrow wilson center for a forum hosted by immigrationworks u.s.a., look at the impact of the latino vote on the 2012 presidential race. we do expect it to get started in just a moment here. also starting live on the companion network c-span3, the pew center is hosting a daylong caucus on the voter experience of 2012. featuring representatives from google, facebook, microsoft and twitter. republican and democratic secretaries of state are also part of that discussion. that has just gotten underway life on our companion network c-span3. also coming up today the center for american progress is hosting a conference. this white house national economic council gene sperling and others are taking part on how education and innovation can benefit the u.s. economy. that's exp
would be numbering in the 10s 220s, not the thousands. as i look at guys like stephen jackson and even guys like ryan clark, those are guys who i think do do it the right way when it comes to teaching their youth football people. i agree with you 100% on the idea of p.s. as for those things i would love to have a little bit of good news coming out about some of the players do you never hear about because they don't drive their car at 1,000 miles an hour or get advice at clubs or throw people out windows. unfortunately those are the stories we never hear and a good thing about our job is once the tv is off, the greatest psas we could possibly do, and i am putting this responsibility on us and the head of the communications department for us to tell those stories because we have thousands of great ones and for the guys you played with, those guys on your team, more often than not those are the very guys you would trust to play football and that is the stories we need to year. >> if i could jump in real quick. i will be brief. you make a good point. the story you got that leads to further
're on the supreme court. right? >> he said, yes. >> you're stephen bryer, right? and he didn't want to embarrass the fellow in front of his wife, and he said, yes. and they thatted which then the guy asked question, what is the best thing about being on the supreme court? he said, i have to say it's the privilege of serving with david souter. how can you not love that guy? >> i will cheat a little bit. my book is as much about the characters trying to become justices as opposed to the justices themselves as the backup of my story, what would happen if you had to replace the majority of the court. and my favorite is nominee named harold carswell, and carswell was considered not the highest caliber nominee for the supreme court, and he got panned in the press as being a mediocre lawyer, and in one of his senate handlers trying to help, went out to the press and said something to the effect of, there's lots of mediocre lawyers and judges and people out there. don't they deserve representation, too? and so that was the end of his chances to become a justice on the supreme court. >> that was roscoe f
. that was not true about lincoln. so he did really let stephen mallory do it. i'll say one last thing about mallory. if there's a create similar of him -- and maybe it's not, maybe it's a positive thing -- mallory was determined to lay the groundwork for a permanent confederate states navy. so he did things during the war not to achieve immediate objective, what do we need to do today and next week, but how can i lay the groundwork, the foundation of a naval infrastructure for the next 50 years? like a naval academy, for example, which he founded and which probably was not necessary. >> well, from reading both of your books, i mean, what i've learned, i think, on this subject is that davis was sort of surprisingly -- whether through channels, whether through mallory or not -- was surprisingly free-wheeling about green lighting technology, innovation. he got to production of ships in a remarkably quick time. when you say that he went from 0 to 50 in a very short time -- >> i would say for him he didn't get in the way, and good for him for not -- >> not a bad thing. and lincoln sort of liked it. as s
. they understood margaret thatcher's rules for stephen the argument then you win the vote. george washington denied that they were marching to climb on the votes in the snow storm had his officers greeted the opening pages of thomas kane's latest pamphlet which washington had asked him to write. he was the great pamphleteer with common sense and describe the declaration of independence and now it was turning out to be really hard. in july of 1776 had turned into a bitter and painful depressing and demoralizing series of defeats. when washington had the crisis which begins these are the times as washington said the first to win the argument then you in the war. people had to believe. i just came here tonight to say to you we have no reason to despair, no reason to back off, no reason to surrender but you have every reason to behave as americans. i look forward to questions. [applause] [applause] so, the speaker has been kind enough to give us a few minutes for questions and answers and all i ask is if you have one you raise your hand. there are people in the aisles with microphones if you can wait u
. at number 6, comedy central talk show host stephen colbert with his book, "america again." william manchester and paul reid present their portrait of winston churchill in "the last lion." this is seventh. neil young is eighth with his memoir, "waging heavy peace," followed by andrew solomon's book, "far from the tree," about parents with exceptional children. then at tenth, bill o'reilly and martin dugard again with "killing lincoln." you can find more on these bestsellers by going to indiebound.org and clicking on indie bestsellers. >> pulitzer prize-winning author william kennedy explores the political and cultural structure of albany in, o albany. booktv spoke with mr. kennedy during our recent visit to albany with the help of our partner, time warner cable. >> albany had a bad rap for a very long time because of the politics, for one thing, but also even way back, way back in the building of the capitol in the 1890s. stanford white, the great architect, was working on the capitol and h.h. richardson, a lot of other major architects. this would prove to be the most expensive bui
. and one of your former clerks, stephen call brees si, has been writing on american exceptionalism. and he's suggesting that in many areas where we differ from the rest of the world, we may well differ because our system is better, and we should emphatically not copy the rest of the world. >> guest: well, i think call bris si is closer to the truth that sandra day o'connor was, but i don't think either of them gets it quite right. the point is our judges were handed this document and said this is what you administer, this is what you decide cases by. the fact that somebody in a similar society has a somewhat different document is no reason to say, well, we have more similarities than differences, therefore, we'll pick up their or law and apply it as if it were ours. that doesn't make any sense at all. you're given our constitution to interpret, and that's what you should interpret and not what some modern german philosopher thinks about the nature of constitutional law. >> host: one question i've heard asked is why shouldn't our judges not -- borrow from things they think are good opinions
came up to me and said good come you're still here, stephen wants to meet you. [laughter] and yes, and he does that he gets his purely reflect live off of my book. [laughter] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> yes, yes. the question is, we focus so much on lincoln, he's so fascinating and the war so dramatic and so terrible with shiloh in april, two days in which more people were killed and in all the battles of all the wars america had fought up to that point in two days. and later at sharpsburg, where more americans were killed and one day than any day before or since to this day. these horrible things rivet our attention and get the congress of 1862, the 37th congress was the most part it is inconsequential probably in our history. they created so many of our favorite institutions, like internal revenue service. more importantly, they missed those like the one the questioner referred to, the homestead act was passed in 1862. the transcontinental railroad act was passed. my favorite though, the moral act, which created the system of land grant colleges and universities in the united sta
it or not, sells 250 copies per year. when you average the millions that stephen king myself, and the one that unites elle of your life if you were to be self published. the american association of publishers concluded that actually this is the interesting part for me. overall, books have actually been increasing steadily since 2008. adult trade book sales are generally out. children's book sales are up. e-books in 2011 outsold hardcover books for the first time. interestingly enough, paperback sales have plunged. that makes sense. people are reading off their books are more likely to do so on a handheld devices. but it's important to keep in mind that the publishing is a very unpredictable and eccentric business. every book is a new startup. when you think about that. part of research, development, design and production, it is a marketing strategy, it is audio development. you can't sell a book by ewen mcewen with the same strategy you used to sell patricia cornwell. each unto itself. it begs the question when we put an ad in "new york times" come it's not like putting an advertisement f
house democrats take on the issue and stephen ola and christina martin and david john of the heritage foundation, on the long-term solvency of social security. "washington journal" is live every morning on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the white house was very controversial as most americans were. >> it was designed for appellate, but americans were having a pellets. it was not particularly awe-inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress that it was neither large or are of the awe-inspiring nature. to . >> "new york times" critic kitty goldberg gathered photographs in history on sunday evening at 730 eastern and pacific on c-span3 american history tv. >> president obama this evening said the u.s. now recognizes the main syrian opposition group as the legitimate representative of its country's people. turkish journalism has reported that the new america foundation. two men have returned from the country into the to the west can do more to help the syrian people. [inaudible conversations] >> welcome, everyone. welcome to c-span on the audience. i am very excited about today's eve
programs about economics. arlie hochschild. then tomorrow stephen han and sara gordon sit down with booktv to talk about their books. also on sunday at 2 p.m. eastern danny danon discussing his book, "israel: the will to prevail," followed by patrick tyler, author of "fortress israel: the inside story of the military elite who run the country and why they can't make peace." watch this and more all weekend long on booktv. for a complete schedule can, visit booktv.org. >> strangle me -- [inaudible] >> give it to him hard! >> he's not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us, i think, in this country we're starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us had experienced in one way or another and had had no words for other than adolescence, other than growing up. finally people were starting to stand back and say, hold on, this isn't actually a normal part of growing up, this isn't a normal rite of passage. i think there was of a moment where there is a possibility for change, and dire
ways. we appreciate your service. and remember ambassador stephens as the hallmark of foreign services is about. our challenge here at home and abroad in the context of terrorism is that the terrorists have to only be lucky once. we have to get it right 100% of the time. it's a heavy burden. not an easy one. obviously this time we didn't get it right. but state acknowledges where it made a mistake, but i find it extraordinary is congress is always very good at doing is only casting blame on one side but never seeming to take any responsibility of its own. and i hear voices that will not accept responsibility. i hear about eighteen accountable review boards. i don't believe it's in this administration eighteen accountability review boards. ic it might be the first, if i'm not mistaken. it's going back over administration, and you can't even implement all of accountability review boards if one of the recommendation is significant part is about resources, and you don't have the resources provided by the congress to meet those recommendations. so i think that we need to take this in the
with stephen that the original is a little outdated in terms of facing all the myriad threats and predation that developed in the war on terror and passed very shortly after 9/11 and we know a lot more from our experience so congress appropriately decided it was time for them to take a look at whether or not we needed to be more explicit and in some areas expand on the a u.s. map. to be in favor of something that did require congress to revisit that every couple years it would be useful to make sure our political leadership rather than leave that hanging out there is something for the next ten years as things develop, as threats either expand or recede, our political leaders in congress should appropriately way in, from justice jackson's famous concurrence with congress and the executive acting together that that is the height of authority in these military matters. the executive is constantly involved in these things. we know where the executive stand but congress can act and sit back and the executive from the law so useful clarifying function for the courts if congress does periodically
to be 500 feet west. used to be 500 feet west. you hurt me here with tongue-in-cheek with stephen stills who want that something is happening here. but it is exact ways that clear. my hope is that others will see that, too. >> thank you him so much. it will cause senator gillibrand. we are so happy senator whitehouse just opened the door and were just thrilled that you are here. senator gillibrand, you and i talked on the phone and i know the person you are carrying along with all my colleagues here. i just want to say that the citizens of new york are so lucky to have you been senator schumer's another's carrying the weight of superstore and sandy so we can fix this and is the mitigation we don't see this again. >> thank you, madam chairwoman for holding this hearing today. i can't tell you how important it is for the congress to understand the depth and breadth of this storm and what impact it had. i also appreciate the kind words and your call in the middle of the storm giving your condolences for the dems and families suffering. i also want to thank my colleagues appearing before this pa
it it would be crazy not to protect this. i a ask that the entire stephen be put on the record. also from west virginia as well. >> without objection we have been joined by a the vice chair of our committee and he will give a short opening statements. >> thank you mad them chairman. >> my apologies. i wanted to be here out of respect to my a colleagues to help present the case for funding of the resources that we've underwent during this storm. even if there are only a few couple hundred homes to them that this as far as their lives are concerned. not only are the seashore's in the interval part of that economic opportunity but to those who owned the second homes move there now it is the first home. there is no asset to more valuable than the home that they own. madame chairwoman i thank you for your help and your leadership and asking in this -- unanimous consent my full statement put into the record. >> thank you very much senator lautenberg i look forward to working with you in working with the states that have been devastated. >> they give very but to for the opportunity to testify for the
. thank you. >> so, good to have you here. i'm stephen dinan, politics editor at the washington times. i believe what if she said. you can learn a lot about in the national stage from immigration conversations and the latino voter in particular, from what went on in arizona, particularly the counterfactual explosion of the limits of -- test the limits of what we can learn about latino voters and their effect on electoral politics and on policy. so, i guess i'd like to start with just sort of a basic question. if somebody were to ask you what a -- the white voter is, i would have no clue how to actually answer that question. so, let's start with the very tough one, which is what is the latino voter? what is a latino voter, in particular, what is the latino voter in arizona? who is he or she? how much of the electorate, how much of the population, the citizenry, who is that person? >> okay. as many in the audience already know, the latino population in the it's is very diverse. various origin, mexican american primarily, also cubans and puerto ricans. in america the latino population is pr
in dangerous places. chris stephens, my friend and colleague understood their diplomats cannot work in bunkers and do their jobs. we have a profound responsibility to ensure the best possible security and support for diplomats and development experts in the field. it's important to recognize that our colleagues in beers of diplomatic security, near east affairs across the department at home and abroad get a pretty countless times a day for years on end in some of the toughest circumstances imaginable. we cannot lose sight of that. do we have learned hard and painful lessons in benghazi, were arty acting on them. we have to do better. we have to do more to constantly reduce the risk people face and make sure they have resources they need. we owe that to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. what over to security professionals who acted with such extraordinary heroism that awful night to protect them when you were to thousands of colleagues serving america with great dedication every day in diplomatic posts around the world. so with that, let me turn to ambassador to create an outdoor
as they a or b report makes clear. as you said, chris stephens understood in gaza as was anyone and understood the risks as well as anyone, but i think one of the painful lessons we've learned is the imports of being able to take a step back and try to analyze better the broader pattern of security challenges that were emerging. so there's a sense of response build on the part of all of us in the state department for trying to better understand those challenges, not be fixated on credible threats and taken into account in keeping with what was the obvious security and adequacies made all these by the accountability review board in benghazi spent on non-going to be interested and i think all the members will be interested as to how you institutionalize that review that go beyond just simple threats. i would hope you would share -- secretary, you mentioned i think he said streamlining a process or you could move quicker to implement. you also mentioned there may be some concerned with additional marine assignments with the host country. is there anything that we need to be aware of as you implem
.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor for the yale law's journal. after clerking for stephen breyer when he was judge of the u.s. court of appeals for the first circuit professor amar joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor amar is a coeditor of the leading constitutional law casebook, decision-decision- making and is th author of several other books including the constitution and criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution a biography and most recently america's unwritten constitution, the president's and decibels we live by. the honorable clarence thomas has served as an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states for nearly 21 years. he attended conceptual cemetery and received an a.b. from the college of the holy cross and his j.d. from yale law school. he served as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977, an attorney with the monsanto company from 77 to 79 and legislative assistant to senator john danforth from 1979 to 1981. from 1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil right
thing verbatim. to stephen barlett, copy to ds command center, subject benghazi up to you. the command center is sharing a terrorism event information for your situational awareness. these contact the ds command center for any requester information. as of 0500 eastern standard time the mission of benghazi has been evacuated due to ongoing attacks that resulted in the death of four chiefs of mission personnel, including u.s. ambassador to libya to three additional wounded. at this time, everyone has been evacuated to tripoli as receiving medical aid and awaiting further movement. this is an initial terrorist incident report from the ds command center. this information contained in this report is provided only for immediate situational awareness. additional reports may follow. updating and correcting information protect accordingly. spu this e-mail is unclassified number prevented by voodoo christopher r. page 101. my concern is this, we knew from the start that it was a terrorist attack. it was a terrorist event and for whatever reason we chose to call it something else, a youtube video
fall where they may. >> with surprise when he teamed a donald barlett and stephen still take your calls, e-mails next month on in depth. the plan had began collaborative work for the co-authors of e-books. >> they contend the level of hyper partisanship has resulted in a dysfunctional political process marked by adherents to political party platforms above all else. this is about an hour and a half. >> i think word ready to begin. i moderate a lot of panels. i always say the greatest insult ever directed to me this ram david brooks. is not a powerful insult? when i have strong views come i try to be the queen of face, staring, staring balanced about things. i am not fair and balanced because my feelings about norm and tom. norman, two of my favorite people in the world and i cannot tell you how excited i am that they have become celebrities in the think it's a great thing for them, a great thing for the republic and i'm just honored to be here with them and susan and mickey would've agreed to join this great discussion. i want to begin by saying this event is the live webcast. attendees
tax hike if we don't act. for weeks stephen has been trying to get the president to come up with a fair, reasonable and balanced solution so we don't go over the cliff. the president thinking he has some sort of a mandate after his reelection has been less than reasonable. in fact, this president has proposed more and more spending and more and more tax hikes in his proposals to the spreerk while the spreerk is -- speaker to is trying to deal with our $16 trillion debt, now $16.4 trillion. the president just can't take yes for an answer. he must think if he keeps slow walking these proposals, the republicans will get the blame and members of his administration have even revealed that they would be more than happy if we went over the cliff. what kind of cruel christmas gift is that? after the speaker and the president exchanged offers this week, house republicans are looking at having votes on two competing pieces of legislation as early as tomorrow. the first is legislation that passed this body over the summer, deeply flawed legislation that every democrat in this body supp
a question -- >> identify yourself, please. >> my name is stephen hank, and i have no affiliation. i'm just retired, come to cato events all the time. i want to ask a question that you probably might consider outside the box, but everything, everything that you're both, you're all saying sort of assumes that there should be criterion of some type administered by the university whether it's academic achievement. and i'd like to throw out to you why the idea that every other service of that's provided in our society is divvied up by price and, therefore, when the people who most need it, who most need it will determine that they're willing to pay the price for the best education. and, in fact, a lot of times you have really brilliant people who have no need to go to university, and they're going to get very little out of things, and it may be the weakest student that may get the best, the most out of the education. my question to you is why is this ab sent in any discussion, what i've just said, of affirmative action or of education? and it's pretty clear that the customers in this situation
office of state finance where she worked for governor frank. next on the panel we have stephen penner, who is the institute fellow and the rj and francis miller chair and public policy at the urban institute. prior to that in his long and distinguished career as he was the director of the congressional budget office where he supervised a young economist who didn't learn a whole lot and that's why i am here and rudy has had a distinguished career that he has had, but i remember those conversations and i hope i can do them justice today to read his also served as the deputy assistant secretary for economic affairs and a senior staff economist at the council of economic advisers. finally, last but not least, we have david walker, founder and ceo of a comeback america initiative david farley the comptroller general of the united states she was also director of the head of the u.s. government accountability office for also, the to tenures. he is widely read and author numerous articles on the deficit coming and he has a new initiative out there now that i think makes tremendous sense it ma
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